Faces in Toast – Fish Delusions (24) – 1971

1971

Don McLean releases American Pie. I could say a lot about this, and probably will later, but I really think the lyrics of this song speak for themselves.

A long, long time ago…
I can still remember
How that music used to make me smile.
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And, maybe, they’d be happy for a while.

But february made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver.
Bad news on the doorstep;
I couldn’t take one more step.

I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride,
But something touched me deep inside
The day the music died.

So bye-bye, miss american pie.
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Did you write the book of love,
And do you have faith in God above,
If the Bible tells you so?
Do you believe in rock ’n roll,
Can music save your mortal soul,
And can you teach me how to dance real slow?

Well, I know that you’re in love with him
`cause I saw you dancin’ in the gym.
You both kicked off your shoes.
Man, I dig those rhythm and blues.

I was a lonely teenage broncin’ buck
With a pink carnation and a pickup truck,
But I knew I was out of luck
The day the music died.

I started singin’,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Now for ten years we’ve been on our own
And moss grows fat on a rollin’ stone,
But that’s not how it used to be.
When the jester sang for the king and queen,
In a coat he borrowed from james dean
And a voice that came from you and me,

Oh, and while the king was looking down,
The jester stole his thorny crown.
The courtroom was adjourned;
No verdict was returned.
And while lennon read a book of marx,
The quartet practiced in the park,
And we sang dirges in the dark
The day the music died.

We were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Helter skelter in a summer swelter.
The birds flew off with a fallout shelter,
Eight miles high and falling fast.
It landed foul on the grass.
The players tried for a forward pass,
With the jester on the sidelines in a cast.

Now the half-time air was sweet perfume
While the sergeants played a marching tune.
We all got up to dance,
Oh, but we never got the chance!
`cause the players tried to take the field;
The marching band refused to yield.
Do you recall what was revealed
The day the music died?

We started singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Oh, and there we were all in one place,
A generation lost in space
With no time left to start again.
So come on: jack be nimble, jack be quick!
Jack flash sat on a candlestick
Cause fire is the devil’s only friend.

Oh, and as I watched him on the stage
My hands were clenched in fists of rage.
No angel born in hell
Could break that satan’s spell.
And as the flames climbed high into the night
To light the sacrificial rite,
I saw satan laughing with delight
The day the music died

He was singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

I met a girl who sang the blues
And I asked her for some happy news,
But she just smiled and turned away.
I went down to the sacred store
Where I’d heard the music years before,
But the man there said the music wouldn’t play.

And in the streets: the children screamed,
The lovers cried, and the poets dreamed.
But not a word was spoken;
The church bells all were broken.
And the three men I admire most:
The father, son, and the holy ghost,
They caught the last train for the coast
The day the music died.

And they were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

They were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.”

Let’s go back to a point that was brought up in the first Faces in Toast post.

This could be another case of an author intending an allegory where someone else intends a different one through him, or maybe not.

I think this analysis of American Pie is a pretty strong one, although I personally would draw different conclusions in certain areas of the song. http://understandingamericanpie.com/index.htm

But I don’t want to cop out on this…I personally think this song has quite a bit to do with the overall theme of The Catcher in the Rye Conspiracy as well as everything else being discussed here.

I don’t want to say Don McLean intended it that way, but to be honest I’d be surprised if he didn’t.  He’s been fairly cryptic on the meaning by intent. It’s an innocence manipulated by forces we don’t see; and the result was a war no one wanted…

In December, John and Yoko make an appearance on the David Frost show and perform a song written about the Attica prison riot in which 43 prisoners and guards perish.

After the song, two audience members take offense to the apparent glorification of the prisoners who lost their lives, and John and Yoko proceed to engage in a discussion with them in which they state their opinion that prisoners at Attica need “freedom”, “love and care”.

While Yoko is responding to the question of how she would feel if one of these prisoners killed her mother, father, son or daughter, you can see just left of the two audience members, a person that looks strangely similar to the appearance of the future assassin of John quietly listening to the conversation.

It’s not Mark David Chapman of course, but that doesn’t really make this scene much less surreal.

Chapman himself has been at this exact same prison for almost 30 years.

Yoko no longer has the opinion that she had in 1971…

Meanwhile Paul releases Ram, which may or may not have anything to do with a biblical story about a substituted sacrifice and certainly has nothing to do with our 13 year journey towards December of 1980.

It means one thing (probably Beatles + McCartney LPs) and yet conveniently highlights a 13 in red.

No one involved has any sense of what is being foreshadowed, but a story that is still far from its completion is being told years in advance of it happening…

Main

1938

1939

1940

1941

1943

1947

1951

1953

1954

1955

1956

1959

1960-1963

1964 (November 22nd 1963)

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

The 27 Club

1970

1971

1972

1973

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

2004

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Author: willemaus

I write things and post things and talk about the things that I write and post...

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